HKS Head Gasket Toyota 3S-GTE

HKS  HKS Co., Ltd. (株式会社エッチ・ケー・エス Kabushiki-gaisha Ecchi Kē Esu?) (JASDAQ: 7219) is a publicly traded company headquartered in Fujinomiya, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan specializing in the production and sales of aftermarket and accessory automotive parts and components.HKS was formed in 1973 by Hiroyuki Hasegawa, a former engineer for Yamaha Motor Company, and his partner Goichi Kitagawa, while the start up capital was supplied by Sigma Automotive (hence the name HKS). The company began operations by tuning gasoline-powered engines in a dairy-farming shed at the foot of Mount Fuji in Japan. Their goal was to design and build high performance engines and components that major OE (original equipment) manufacturers could not or would not produce. In July 1974, Hasegawa engineered and built the first commercialized turbocharger kit for passenger automobiles; since then developing turbocharger upgrades and bolt-on turbocharger kits that subsequently became the core business of HKS. Hasegawa also created the first commercially available electronic turbo timer and boost controller.
HKS is a publicly traded company with an international sales and distribution network spanning Asia, Europe, Australia and the Americas to support its customer base. The main manufacturing and R&D facility is at the foot of Mount Fuji. Subsidiary companies have been established in California (HKS USA), Cambridgeshire, England (HKS Europe), and Bangkok, Thailand (HKS Thailand). HKS USA, established in 1982, shut down operations in 2011 electing instead to use wholesale distributors to handle their supply chain in the USA. Motovicity Distribution was selected as the North American warehouse for HKS where a full inventory of products is maintained for HKS’ North American customers. (Wikipedia)
METAL HEAD GASKETS
HKS  HKS Co., Ltd. (株式会社エッチ・ケー・エス Kabushiki-gaisha Ecchi Kē Esu?) (JASDAQ: 7219) is a publicly traded company headquartered in Fujinomiya, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan specializing in the production and sales of aftermarket and accessory automotive parts and components.HKS was formed in 1973 by Hiroyuki Hasegawa, a former engineer for Yamaha Motor Company, and his partner Goichi Kitagawa, while the start up capital was supplied by Sigma Automotive (hence the name HKS). The company began operations by tuning gasoline-powered engines in a dairy-farming shed at the foot of Mount Fuji in Japan. Their goal was to design and build high performance engines and components that major OE (original equipment) manufacturers could not or would not produce. In July 1974, Hasegawa engineered and built the first commercialized turbocharger kit for passenger automobiles; since then developing turbocharger upgrades and bolt-on turbocharger kits that subsequently became the core business of HKS. Hasegawa also created the first commercially available electronic turbo timer and boost controller.
HKS is a publicly traded company with an international sales and distribution network spanning Asia, Europe, Australia and the Americas to support its customer base. The main manufacturing and R&D facility is at the foot of Mount Fuji. Subsidiary companies have been established in California (HKS USA), Cambridgeshire, England (HKS Europe), and Bangkok, Thailand (HKS Thailand). HKS USA, established in 1982, shut down operations in 2011 electing instead to use wholesale distributors to handle their supply chain in the USA. Motovicity Distribution was selected as the North American warehouse for HKS where a full inventory of products is maintained for HKS’ North American customers. (Wikipedia)
metal head gasket  A head gasket is a gasket that sits between the engine block and cylinder head(s) in an internal combustion engine.
Its purpose is to seal the cylinders to ensure maximum compression and avoid leakage of coolant or engine oil into the cylinders; as such, it is the most critical sealing application in any engine, and, as part of the combustion chamber, it shares the same strength requirements as other combustion chamber components

MLS or Multiple Layers Steel – Most modern head engines are produced with MLS gaskets. These typically consist of three layers of steel. The contact faces are usually coated with a rubber-like coating such as Viton that adheres to the cylinder block and cylinder head while the thicker center layer is left bare.
Solid copper – a solid sheet of copper, and typically requires special machining called 'o-ringing' that places a piece of wire around the circumference of the cylinder to bite into the copper. When this is performed copper gaskets are extremely durable. Recently companies have started producing copper gaskets with integral sealing wires permitting their retrofit into engines without the removal of the engine block for machine work.
Composite – an older technology. Typically these are made from asbestos or graphite but are more prone to blowouts than newer gaskets. Asbestos gaskets are becoming increasingly rare due to health concerns.[2]
Elastomeric – a gasket type used by Rover on their K Series engines. It utilised a steel core plate with molded in place silicon rubber beads to seal oil and coolant passages. The bores were sealed by rolled steel fire rings in a more conventional manner. The idea behind the gasket design was to produce a production version of the technology used in F1 engines at the time. The original application of the gasket on the smaller versions of the K Series was very successful. However, an engine redesign resulted in persistent problems with the design – the joint interface became unstable and the gasket could not cope.
The cost of a replacement gasket is usually not extreme, but the price of total repair is significantly high. This is because removing/replacing an engine head is very time consuming - around 75% of cost will be labor. Furthermore, untreated blown gaskets usually seriously damage the engine, then requiring even more expensive work.
(Wikipedia)
s are constructed from multiple layers of steel to ensure proper head to block sealing under the most demanding high performance conditions. To ensure gasket integrity, each HKS  HKS Co., Ltd. (株式会社エッチ・ケー・エス Kabushiki-gaisha Ecchi Kē Esu?) (JASDAQ: 7219) is a publicly traded company headquartered in Fujinomiya, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan specializing in the production and sales of aftermarket and accessory automotive parts and components.HKS was formed in 1973 by Hiroyuki Hasegawa, a former engineer for Yamaha Motor Company, and his partner Goichi Kitagawa, while the start up capital was supplied by Sigma Automotive (hence the name HKS). The company began operations by tuning gasoline-powered engines in a dairy-farming shed at the foot of Mount Fuji in Japan. Their goal was to design and build high performance engines and components that major OE (original equipment) manufacturers could not or would not produce. In July 1974, Hasegawa engineered and built the first commercialized turbocharger kit for passenger automobiles; since then developing turbocharger upgrades and bolt-on turbocharger kits that subsequently became the core business of HKS. Hasegawa also created the first commercially available electronic turbo timer and boost controller.
HKS is a publicly traded company with an international sales and distribution network spanning Asia, Europe, Australia and the Americas to support its customer base. The main manufacturing and R&D facility is at the foot of Mount Fuji. Subsidiary companies have been established in California (HKS USA), Cambridgeshire, England (HKS Europe), and Bangkok, Thailand (HKS Thailand). HKS USA, established in 1982, shut down operations in 2011 electing instead to use wholesale distributors to handle their supply chain in the USA. Motovicity Distribution was selected as the North American warehouse for HKS where a full inventory of products is maintained for HKS’ North American customers. (Wikipedia)
head gasket  A head gasket is a gasket that sits between the engine block and cylinder head(s) in an internal combustion engine.
Its purpose is to seal the cylinders to ensure maximum compression and avoid leakage of coolant or engine oil into the cylinders; as such, it is the most critical sealing application in any engine, and, as part of the combustion chamber, it shares the same strength requirements as other combustion chamber components

MLS or Multiple Layers Steel – Most modern head engines are produced with MLS gaskets. These typically consist of three layers of steel. The contact faces are usually coated with a rubber-like coating such as Viton that adheres to the cylinder block and cylinder head while the thicker center layer is left bare.
Solid copper – a solid sheet of copper, and typically requires special machining called 'o-ringing' that places a piece of wire around the circumference of the cylinder to bite into the copper. When this is performed copper gaskets are extremely durable. Recently companies have started producing copper gaskets with integral sealing wires permitting their retrofit into engines without the removal of the engine block for machine work.
Composite – an older technology. Typically these are made from asbestos or graphite but are more prone to blowouts than newer gaskets. Asbestos gaskets are becoming increasingly rare due to health concerns.[2]
Elastomeric – a gasket type used by Rover on their K Series engines. It utilised a steel core plate with molded in place silicon rubber beads to seal oil and coolant passages. The bores were sealed by rolled steel fire rings in a more conventional manner. The idea behind the gasket design was to produce a production version of the technology used in F1 engines at the time. The original application of the gasket on the smaller versions of the K Series was very successful. However, an engine redesign resulted in persistent problems with the design – the joint interface became unstable and the gasket could not cope.
The cost of a replacement gasket is usually not extreme, but the price of total repair is significantly high. This is because removing/replacing an engine head is very time consuming - around 75% of cost will be labor. Furthermore, untreated blown gaskets usually seriously damage the engine, then requiring even more expensive work.
(Wikipedia)
is made from a special metal that resists sever levels of heat that is generated from high horsepower and high-boost. In addition to the durable internal construction, all HKS  HKS Co., Ltd. (株式会社エッチ・ケー・エス Kabushiki-gaisha Ecchi Kē Esu?) (JASDAQ: 7219) is a publicly traded company headquartered in Fujinomiya, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan specializing in the production and sales of aftermarket and accessory automotive parts and components.HKS was formed in 1973 by Hiroyuki Hasegawa, a former engineer for Yamaha Motor Company, and his partner Goichi Kitagawa, while the start up capital was supplied by Sigma Automotive (hence the name HKS). The company began operations by tuning gasoline-powered engines in a dairy-farming shed at the foot of Mount Fuji in Japan. Their goal was to design and build high performance engines and components that major OE (original equipment) manufacturers could not or would not produce. In July 1974, Hasegawa engineered and built the first commercialized turbocharger kit for passenger automobiles; since then developing turbocharger upgrades and bolt-on turbocharger kits that subsequently became the core business of HKS. Hasegawa also created the first commercially available electronic turbo timer and boost controller.
HKS is a publicly traded company with an international sales and distribution network spanning Asia, Europe, Australia and the Americas to support its customer base. The main manufacturing and R&D facility is at the foot of Mount Fuji. Subsidiary companies have been established in California (HKS USA), Cambridgeshire, England (HKS Europe), and Bangkok, Thailand (HKS Thailand). HKS USA, established in 1982, shut down operations in 2011 electing instead to use wholesale distributors to handle their supply chain in the USA. Motovicity Distribution was selected as the North American warehouse for HKS where a full inventory of products is maintained for HKS’ North American customers. (Wikipedia)
head gasket  A head gasket is a gasket that sits between the engine block and cylinder head(s) in an internal combustion engine.
Its purpose is to seal the cylinders to ensure maximum compression and avoid leakage of coolant or engine oil into the cylinders; as such, it is the most critical sealing application in any engine, and, as part of the combustion chamber, it shares the same strength requirements as other combustion chamber components

MLS or Multiple Layers Steel – Most modern head engines are produced with MLS gaskets. These typically consist of three layers of steel. The contact faces are usually coated with a rubber-like coating such as Viton that adheres to the cylinder block and cylinder head while the thicker center layer is left bare.
Solid copper – a solid sheet of copper, and typically requires special machining called 'o-ringing' that places a piece of wire around the circumference of the cylinder to bite into the copper. When this is performed copper gaskets are extremely durable. Recently companies have started producing copper gaskets with integral sealing wires permitting their retrofit into engines without the removal of the engine block for machine work.
Composite – an older technology. Typically these are made from asbestos or graphite but are more prone to blowouts than newer gaskets. Asbestos gaskets are becoming increasingly rare due to health concerns.[2]
Elastomeric – a gasket type used by Rover on their K Series engines. It utilised a steel core plate with molded in place silicon rubber beads to seal oil and coolant passages. The bores were sealed by rolled steel fire rings in a more conventional manner. The idea behind the gasket design was to produce a production version of the technology used in F1 engines at the time. The original application of the gasket on the smaller versions of the K Series was very successful. However, an engine redesign resulted in persistent problems with the design – the joint interface became unstable and the gasket could not cope.
The cost of a replacement gasket is usually not extreme, but the price of total repair is significantly high. This is because removing/replacing an engine head is very time consuming - around 75% of cost will be labor. Furthermore, untreated blown gaskets usually seriously damage the engine, then requiring even more expensive work.
(Wikipedia)
s are coated with a special fluorine rubber to provide ultimate sealing. HKS  HKS Co., Ltd. (株式会社エッチ・ケー・エス Kabushiki-gaisha Ecchi Kē Esu?) (JASDAQ: 7219) is a publicly traded company headquartered in Fujinomiya, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan specializing in the production and sales of aftermarket and accessory automotive parts and components.HKS was formed in 1973 by Hiroyuki Hasegawa, a former engineer for Yamaha Motor Company, and his partner Goichi Kitagawa, while the start up capital was supplied by Sigma Automotive (hence the name HKS). The company began operations by tuning gasoline-powered engines in a dairy-farming shed at the foot of Mount Fuji in Japan. Their goal was to design and build high performance engines and components that major OE (original equipment) manufacturers could not or would not produce. In July 1974, Hasegawa engineered and built the first commercialized turbocharger kit for passenger automobiles; since then developing turbocharger upgrades and bolt-on turbocharger kits that subsequently became the core business of HKS. Hasegawa also created the first commercially available electronic turbo timer and boost controller.
HKS is a publicly traded company with an international sales and distribution network spanning Asia, Europe, Australia and the Americas to support its customer base. The main manufacturing and R&D facility is at the foot of Mount Fuji. Subsidiary companies have been established in California (HKS USA), Cambridgeshire, England (HKS Europe), and Bangkok, Thailand (HKS Thailand). HKS USA, established in 1982, shut down operations in 2011 electing instead to use wholesale distributors to handle their supply chain in the USA. Motovicity Distribution was selected as the North American warehouse for HKS where a full inventory of products is maintained for HKS’ North American customers. (Wikipedia)
head gasket  A head gasket is a gasket that sits between the engine block and cylinder head(s) in an internal combustion engine.
Its purpose is to seal the cylinders to ensure maximum compression and avoid leakage of coolant or engine oil into the cylinders; as such, it is the most critical sealing application in any engine, and, as part of the combustion chamber, it shares the same strength requirements as other combustion chamber components

MLS or Multiple Layers Steel – Most modern head engines are produced with MLS gaskets. These typically consist of three layers of steel. The contact faces are usually coated with a rubber-like coating such as Viton that adheres to the cylinder block and cylinder head while the thicker center layer is left bare.
Solid copper – a solid sheet of copper, and typically requires special machining called 'o-ringing' that places a piece of wire around the circumference of the cylinder to bite into the copper. When this is performed copper gaskets are extremely durable. Recently companies have started producing copper gaskets with integral sealing wires permitting their retrofit into engines without the removal of the engine block for machine work.
Composite – an older technology. Typically these are made from asbestos or graphite but are more prone to blowouts than newer gaskets. Asbestos gaskets are becoming increasingly rare due to health concerns.[2]
Elastomeric – a gasket type used by Rover on their K Series engines. It utilised a steel core plate with molded in place silicon rubber beads to seal oil and coolant passages. The bores were sealed by rolled steel fire rings in a more conventional manner. The idea behind the gasket design was to produce a production version of the technology used in F1 engines at the time. The original application of the gasket on the smaller versions of the K Series was very successful. However, an engine redesign resulted in persistent problems with the design – the joint interface became unstable and the gasket could not cope.
The cost of a replacement gasket is usually not extreme, but the price of total repair is significantly high. This is because removing/replacing an engine head is very time consuming - around 75% of cost will be labor. Furthermore, untreated blown gaskets usually seriously damage the engine, then requiring even more expensive work.
(Wikipedia)
s are designed for to accommodate over sized piston  A piston is a component of reciprocating engines, reciprocating pumps, gas compressors and pneumatic cylinders, among other similar mechanisms. It is the moving component that is contained by a cylinder and is made gas-tight by piston rings. In an engine, its purpose is to transfer force from expanding gas in the cylinder to the crankshaft via a piston rod and/or connecting rod. In a pump, the function is reversed and force is transferred from the crankshaft to the piston for the purpose of compressing or ejecting the fluid in the cylinder. In some engines, the piston also acts as a valve by covering and uncovering ports in the cylinder wall

The piston of an internal combustion engine is acted upon by the pressure of the expanding combustion gases in the combustion chamber space at the top of the cylinder. This force then acts downwards through the connecting rod and onto the crankshaft. The connecting rod is attached to the piston by a swivelling gudgeon pin (US: wrist pin). This pin is mounted within the piston: unlike the steam engine, there is no piston rod or crosshead (except big two stroke engines).
The pin itself is of hardened steel and is fixed in the piston, but free to move in the connecting rod. A few designs use a 'fully floating' design that is loose in both components. All pins must be prevented from moving sideways and the ends of the pin digging into the cylinder wall, usually by circlips.
Gas sealing is achieved by the use of piston rings. These are a number of narrow iron rings, fitted loosely into grooves in the piston, just below the crown. The rings are split at a point in the rim, allowing them to press against the cylinder with a light spring pressure. Two types of ring are used: the upper rings have solid faces and provide gas sealing; lower rings have narrow edges and a U-shaped profile, to act as oil scrapers. There are many proprietary and detail design features associated with piston rings.
Pistons are cast from aluminium alloys. For better strength and fatigue life, some racing pistons may be forged instead. Early pistons were of cast iron, but there were obvious benefits for engine balancing if a lighter alloy could be used. To produce pistons that could survive engine combustion temperatures, it was necessary to develop new alloys such as Y alloy and Hiduminium, specifically for use as pistons.
A few early gas engines[note 1] had double-acting cylinders, but otherwise effectively all internal combustion engine pistons are single-acting. During World War II, the US submarine Pompano[note 2] was fitted with a prototype of the infamously unreliable H.O.R. double-acting two-stroke diesel engine. Although compact, for use in a cramped submarine, this design of engine was not repeated.
(Wikipedia)
s and altered compression ratios. For certain applications, multiple gasket thicknesses are available to change the dynamic compression ratio for various levels of tuning and engine conditions.

Art.Nr.: NI-HKS2301-RT034

Hersteller: HKS

0 Bewertung(en) | Bewertung schreiben

515.00 CHF

incl. 8 % MwsT zzgl. Versandkosten

Sofort versandfähig, ausreichende Stückzahl
+ -